What did you do to your bike today?

Discussion in 'Technical & Maintenance' started by fortech, Oct 10, 2014.

  1. Wayne

    Wayne Well-Known Member

    I’ve never bought grips. But I was told that some grips are hard and wear out your gloves. Since most gloves are expensive, they recommended a softer grips. Just a thought.
     
  2. Trash

    Trash Active Member

    I have purchased “grip puppies” handgrip covers for probably my last six motorcycles.
    With the help of a little dishwashing detergent, they slip right over the stock hand grips, and are considerably easier on the hands than any stock grips I have ever used. The only minor potential negative is that they increase the grip diameter slightly, although in my case, I consider that another plus. I have had friends who raised concerns about them potentially affecting heated grip output, but I have not found it to be the case personally. I think the last pair I bought cost me all of $25, and they are extremely durable. I believe they are made in the U.K.
     
  3. sleepyhead65

    sleepyhead65 Member

  4. HunterSon

    HunterSon Active Member

    I have the same on my FJ. I needed the extra diameter, helps with the hand cramps. They went on super easy if you roll them back on themselves about half way and spray the regular grips with hairspray for lube. Took under a minute to install each one.
     
  5. skibum69

    skibum69 Active Member

    I do not like a fat grip at all, too much arm pump offroad
     
  6. Trash

    Trash Active Member

    What do the hand grips have to do with your arms?
    I don’t quite understand the correlation. :(
     
    keith likes this.
  7. HunterSon

    HunterSon Active Member

    I think it has to do with the amount of force used in gripping the bar. On the road for long periods a bigger grip relaxes my hand and prevents cramping. Riding hard offroad your grip strength varies from a light touch to “hold on, she’s gettin away” over and over along with much more clutch and brake use. A larger diameter grip will cause fatigue in the forearm muscles (arm pump) faster than a smaller diameter grip.
     
  8. skibum69

    skibum69 Active Member

    The bigger grip changes the size of your grip which affects how it relates to your arms. The key in off-road is to relax your hands while still holding on with the needed force. Smaller grips to do this more effectively.
     
    Wayne likes this.
  9. Wayne

    Wayne Well-Known Member

    I agree. I have fat grips on my ATV, and it's always a noticeable relief when I go back to riding my bike with smaller grips. But it's all about personal preference.
     
  10. sleepyhead65

    sleepyhead65 Member

    So this is what I ended up with. The grips turned out to be shorter than I expected. I guess this is an "MX grip" thing? But they are comfortable and tacky. They are also thin on the palm and a slight build up in the finger areas.

    IMG_0467[1].JPG IMG_0468[1].JPG

    The bike is still a long way from complete. I have all of the final drive (chain, sprockets), wheel bearings, headlights, Front and rear tires, rear turn signals, rear suspension, and a front fender purchased but my current speed is about one night per week so I'm a little worried I'll be late to the trails this spring. Here's what she looks like atm all stripped nekkid:

    IMG_0469[1].JPG
     
  11. sleepyhead65

    sleepyhead65 Member

    Over the weekend I managed to squeeze out enough time to replace the rear wheel bearings and sprocket. I also s[ent a bunch of time cleaning all of the old gunk away from the counter shaft area. CLeaning seems to take as much or more time tha n actual repair work I find.

    I also got the LED head lights figured out and remounted the headlight assembly. Again lots of cleaning and organizing of the front wiring and sealing up connections. INthe end I didn't do as good a job as I would like but the improvement over the original state was vast.
     
  12. murph

    murph Well-Known Member

    I replaced 2 pistons in the front caliper on the Big Ruckus today. These are activated by the front brake lever and a third, smaller piston is activated by the rear lever. The two hydraulic systems are kept separate from each other and as such the rear system has to be bled from both ends of the scooter.
    Looks (and the rider) are not the only odd thing on this machine
     
  13. Wayne

    Wayne Well-Known Member

    The Honda Varadero has linked braking as well. I really like the design.
     
  14. skibum69

    skibum69 Active Member

    604 wheels are in for new bearings and the front brake calipers are getting cleaned up
     
  15. sleepyhead65

    sleepyhead65 Member

    Rough day in the garage today with no success on anything but cleaning.

    1. tried to replace the front brake pads. not because they were worn but because their age is unknown. |Pin holding pads in place is seized. despite heat and liberal penetrating oil I couldn't open it while leaving it on the bike. So took apart what |I could, cleaned it all up and left it with penetrating oil to soak for an extended period.

    2. figured I'd have a go on the rears and had the exact same problem so it too sits nice and clean with oil on either side of the pins but still attached to the bike. and time to m

    3. had planned to install a new motard fender on the fork brace (low fender style). Looked at the brace several times. kept coming back to it wondering if that brace can handle having four holes drilled in it. |Looked at the new fender again and again. Kept wondering if mounting it high will stop the mud getting thrown up high like the old one...it's a little larger. Again...wonder to self if even a low mount is going to stop that. Eventually I decide to do nothing except consult the cloud for direction who actually knows what they are talking about on this bike.

    So thats it for the day. In the end I figure it's lunch time. I wonder if I'm at all suited to mechanical work. |Probably not. When things go wrong I over-react.
     
  16. HerrDeacon

    HerrDeacon Member

    We all have days like that in the garage, I've had more than I care to remember. I try to just walk away from it and do something else before I end up breaking something. Also, check to make sure I'm doing it correctly. Can be frustrating though when you have plans for the day and the bike has different ideas.

    I was able to get in some garage time as well and managed to disassemble one of the CB350 rear shocks for cleaning, installed new 530 HD chain and chain guard and cleaned the clutch lifter parts. Hope to install the clutch lifter tomorrow so I can route the cable and measure what length I need to order.

    chain_03.jpg
     
  17. sleepyhead65

    sleepyhead65 Member

    soo a 530 chain? That seems pretty beefy for a small bike
     
  18. HerrDeacon

    HerrDeacon Member

    I agree, I had to check the spec a couple of times before I ordered it. Must be so it can handle all that raw power :) It does make respectable power for an air-cooled engine though, 36 hp and 18.5 ft-lb.
     
    sleepyhead65 likes this.
  19. sleepyhead65

    sleepyhead65 Member

    More raw power than a KLR 650!
     
  20. murph

    murph Well-Known Member

    Installed a new Hall Effect sensor in the GSA today. Been putting it off for a while and carrying it around during that procrastiation period. A known problem that BMW updated midway through the 02 model year. Mine was previous to the update and though the company never issued a recall they damned well should have if they recognized an issue. The wiring cracks in the old unit and will leave you stranded when in the rain. Suckiest of times for that to happen.
    It resides behind the pulley for the alternator belt (yes, just like your car) so while I had it off I replaced the belt as well as did the valve clearances, cleaned the starter bendix drive and installed fresh plugs for the upcoming season.
     

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