Survived the Burgeo Highway.

Discussion in 'Pho-togs untie' started by Jim C-G, Sep 30, 2018.

  1. Jim C-G

    Jim C-G Active Member

    Part 4 (last part) of my mid-September trip down to Burgeo and camping at Sandbanks Provincial Park. It was a good shakedown and I am now into some camper renovations and additions. I've also found a few cubic feet of stuff i don't have to take with me.
     
    Bob likes this.
  2. Wayne

    Wayne Well-Known Member

    Sounds like there’s a sticker to be made. I bought one after I survived the TLH.

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    Backdraft likes this.
  3. Jim C-G

    Jim C-G Active Member

    I think a Tran Labrador Highway sticker is well warranted. The Burgeo is over hyped for being bad. Even with 3 wheel tracks to be worried about I did not find it nasty as long as I was watching the road and not the scenery. Sure, there are a few potholes that will destroy a rim but I've done that just driving around Corner Brook.
     
    TonisToo likes this.
  4. TonisToo

    TonisToo Active Member

    You mention in your video that you may be leaving the island. Do you have a new place in mind? Just being nosey and wondering what new motorcycling destinations it might open up. We've been thinking about moving to BC when my girls are finished University.
     
  5. Jim C-G

    Jim C-G Active Member

    I just retired and have siblings in Nova Scotia, grown kids and grand kids in New Brunswick. Plan on selling the house in the spring and then it will be one of those 2 provinces. Grew up in Liverpool, NS... a pulp and paper town like Corner Brook (but mill now gone) and worked the early part of my adult life in Fredericton, NB. Going to keep away from the big cities. Lots of back paved roads. I can travel without worrying about the ferry and I want to be a maximum of an hour and half from a Costco.
     
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  6. murph

    murph Well-Known Member

    Every part of your response makes perfect sense but the Costco statement? Toilet paper (and everything else) in bulk? Us old bachelors would only need to go there once a year. Maybe my mindset would be different if I had a trailer for the scooter.
     
  7. Jim C-G

    Jim C-G Active Member

    Wine kits Murph, wine kits. Another bonus of the trailer.
     
  8. RossKean

    RossKean Active Member

    I live in Fredericton and retirement for me (hopefully in a year or two) will not likely be in New Brunswick. While we have more warm days than you do and warm spring days come a bit earlier, the winters are nasty cold. Lots of snow too but you see that as well. The older I get, the less tolerant I am of really cold weather - sometimes for weeks on end around here. There is some decent riding (although limited) in NS and NB - I prefer NL. NB is a little more "central" and easier to get to New England, Quebec etc. New Hampshire is an easy day from Fredericton but the four extra hours from Halifax makes it tough. Same with Gaspé. Unfortunately, there isn't much new within a day (or two) of riding but I guess that is the same wherever you live. At least with retirement (especially with the camper), longer road trips are easier to manage.
     
  9. Jim C-G

    Jim C-G Active Member

    Ross, every province has it pros and cons.
    The lack of accessible land, the taxes, possible electrical rate increases and the damn ferry are all the nails in my Newfoundland coffin. I will admit that I have been here the longest of any place in my adult life. I don't mind living outside a small city like Corner Brook but occasionally I would like something bigger closer than 7 hours away. I grew up on the south Shore of Nova Scotia and know most of the province fairly well. I lived in F'ton for close to 15 years and toured many winters with Theatre New Brunswick... I know the winters. I spent 6 years in Thunder Bay. That was COLD. Weather is changing... maybe there is more snow in NB now. Drought-like conditions in southwestern NS. More snow most winters in St. John's than on the ski resort here at Marble Mountain. NB has a border with potential hordes from the south fleeing climate change and tyranny.
    I do need a change. My french is too poor for Quebec, have no interest in Ontario, the prairies are too desolate, so maybe that leaves living with hippies in the burnt out forests of BC. Am I getting cynical in my old age?
    It takes a day to get off or back on the island, so an extra 4 hours or a day to get to New Hampshire and south doesn't seem too bad. You are right that the trailer and retirement will make a difference. I'm looking at it as a great base camp for several days exploring regions.
    I may just become a homeless vagabond for a couple of years.
     
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  10. skibum69

    skibum69 Active Member

    I spent 20 years roaming around North America ski bumming and saw a lot of places I could live, for 6 months at a time. Now having been home for 13 years, 11+ where I am now, I don't see me ever moving again. Hopping out of province for work on a regular basis keeps the wanderer in me mostly in check.
     
  11. murph

    murph Well-Known Member

    I have always considered the NB/NS border area to be central enough to everything. Near enough to the salt water and far enough from the city with the possibility of trips in each direction with enough differing routes to keep it interesting.
    Thinking of winding down my working days as well but winter is long and hard on my brain some years.
    The last couple of years I have used the Argentia ferry on the way off the island and although it ain't cheap I have run to and from PaB so many times it is just a slog to be endured.
     
  12. TonisToo

    TonisToo Active Member

    Very nice, I think that would be a fantastic area for a retired motorcyclist. I hope you continue your videos here.
     
  13. RossKean

    RossKean Active Member

    In terms of a starting point for riding, I would say that where I live is at least as good as anywhere. Anywhere in the Maritimes, New England, southern Quebec, much of southern Ontario and the ferry to Newfoundland are all within easy reach for a day's drive. As I mentioned, my biggest beef for my part of NB is the winter.

    While NL temperatures may be milder, the overall climate is not my personal preference either (although I love to visit). I also understand the frustration of having to take a full day just to get off the island. I guess the problem is that once you have become totally exhausted with all of the local riding opportunities, how far do you have to go for new experiences? I lived in south-central BC (Kootenay area) for a couple of years and there were some fantastic places within a day's travel. Don't know if I would want to retire there...
     
  14. Wayne

    Wayne Well-Known Member

    Parts of BC have super hot summers and snowy winters, from what I hear.....I hate the hot weather and hate snow. Parts there now have a heavy snowfall warning today.
     
  15. RossKean

    RossKean Active Member

    In the Kootenays (Castlegar/Trail area), the summers were hot but not excessively humid (I don't mind that). While winters had a lot of snow, there was little wind and the temperatures were not terribly cold. Very little freezing rain. A definite progression of seasons with real and distinct spring, summer, autumn and winter. Snow was mostly gone by first of March and while March and April tended to be rainy, temperatures were mild (no snow!). In the spring, you could play a round of golf in the valley in the morning and drive 15 km (up a mountain) and ski in the afternoon.
    (Current snowfall warning is at higher elevation and a bit north of where I lived. As with any high elevation area, weather can be a lot less predictable - Castlegar where I lived and Trail where I worked are down in the Columbia River valley)

    I really enjoyed the climate the two years I was there.
     
    TonisToo likes this.
  16. Wayne

    Wayne Well-Known Member

    If I lived there, I'd probably trade my bike in for a boat :)
     

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