Pacific Northwest Trip

Discussion in 'Ride Reports & Photos' started by Trash, Jun 19, 2018.

  1. Trash

    Trash Active Member

    On Monday morning we pointed the GS' back East.
    After a delicious Dungeness crabcake breakfast on the Tacoma waterfront, we headed inland to increasing clouds and dropping temperatures. By the time we reached the entrance to Mount Rainier National Park, it was raining steadily. We decided to take the ride up the mountain despite the conditions, and were not surprised to watch the temperature plummet, and the rain turn to sleet as we reached the top. Visibility was about 20 meters, and there was still snow on the ground. We did not linger in the near freezing weather before seeking shelter in a cabin just outside the Park entrance for the night.
     
  2. Bob

    Bob Member

    Nothing like adding a bit of sleet to your adventure eh?o_O
     
  3. Trash

    Trash Active Member

    I noticed on the Weather Channel yesterday that they received three inches of snow in Logan Pass in Montana. Lucky it was a week ago that we were there!
     
  4. Trash

    Trash Active Member

    We left Mt. Rainier early on a chilly Tuesday morning, with a late morning appointment for a 6,000 mile service for my GS at the BMW Dealership in Clarkston, WA, which happened to be on our travel route. I made it with 15 miles to spare on the service minder. That was cutting it close!
    After the service was completed, we followed U.S. Rte. 12 across Idaho. The sign that said curves next 99 miles said it all. The ride into Missoula was great.
     
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  5. Trash

    Trash Active Member

    We left Missoula for a briskly paced 2+ hour ride to breakfast in downtown Bozeman. Montana has always prided itself with the highest daytime speed limit in the Country, which currently stands at 80mph. We were surprised to see that most everyone adheres to that limit. It is easy to wrack up some big miles, but the consumption also increases dramatically, resulting in more frequent fuel stops. While my overall fuel economy for the Trip came to 43mpg, it dropped to 35 on the Montana Interstate.
    After breakfast, it was time to part ways, as Turk headed for I-90 and his Milwaukee home, and I detoured South for a quick run through the North side of Yellowstone National Park.
     
  6. Trash

    Trash Active Member

    IMG_0216.JPG
    I rode the North Loop through Yellowstone, and was disappointed to see that the Summer crowds were already out. It is a stunning place, but you have to mentally prepare yourself for the parade of traffic that will stop if there is any help hint of wildlife about. I took a break in the Lamar Valley, on the Northeast corner of the Park, once the crowds thinned.
     
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  7. RossKean

    RossKean Active Member

    My one and only trip through Yellowstone was about this time eight years ago. Cold miserable wet day but at least the crowds weren't too bad. Spent an afternoon and the following morning riding around, looking at stuff and avoiding some locales (i.e. Old Faithful) and headed out the northeast corner. Planned on doing Beartooth but closed due to snow the previous night. Enjoyed Chief Joseph route instead.
     
  8. Trash

    Trash Active Member

    IMG_0225.JPG Speaking of which...
    My real reason for the ride through Yellowstone was the desire to once again tackle the Beartooth Highway, easily the best route over a mountain pass in North America. I was not disappointed, although there was still snow on the ground at the more than two mile high pass. The ride up and over should be on every North American motorcyclists bucket list.
     
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  9. Bob

    Bob Member

    Thanks for bringing back some great memories of riding in that area Trash. (Did Going To The Sun Road one year; another trip to ride the passes between Red Lodge, Coady, Ten Sleeps and Billings; and another trip to Custer for some riding in South Dakota.)

    If you haven't done this already you can find some pretty 'focused' riding on Hwy 4 from Port Alberni out to Tofino on Vancouver Island and the Duffy Lake Rd (Hwy 99) from Pemberton to Lillooett in BC:
    https://www.google.com/imgres?imgur...d=0ahUKEwi28azR3JLcAhUinOAKHd4zAUAQ_B0I1AEwEA

    Hwy 6 and 31A in south central BC are pretty twisty as well if you're in that area.
     
  10. Trash

    Trash Active Member

    I have done some extensive touring in BC, including the routes you mentioned, but have never made it to Vancouver Island. Funny, since I could see it clearly from the Olympic Peninsula of Washington. Unfortunately my riding partner had time constraints that prevented us from venturing North of the Border. I will have to keep it in mind for the next Trip out that way!
     
  11. Trash

    Trash Active Member

    I transitioned to “Iron Butt Mode” when I left the Motel in Red Lodge Montana a week ago Thursday morning.
    After the hour long ride on two lane to reach the Interstate in Billings, I set the cruise control to an indicated 85mph and followed I-94 across Montana and North Dakota, stopping only for fuels (bike and body). I found myself coming to a halt as I entered the outskirts of Fargo, ND. Road reconstruction at rush hour in 90 degree heat. Perfect timing. NOT.
    Although I had originally planned on stopping in Fargo for the night, the inhospitable conditions convinced me to push onward another hour to Fergus Falls, MN. Total mileage for the day was 1,200 km. The funny thing was, I got into such a “groove” that I might have made it all the way home were it not for my decision to no longer ride in the North Woods after dusk. Something about self-preservation...
     
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  12. Trash

    Trash Active Member

    IMG_0230.JPG I made it home with just over 5,000 miles for the 14 day trip. The OEM Anakee III rear tire is about toast at just over 9,000 miles. I pulled a TKC-70 rear tire out of my crawl space inventory for Monday replacement. It always pays to buy spare tires when they are on sale, and I wanted to upgrade to something with better grip on the fire roads. Time will tell.
     
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  13. Bob

    Bob Member

    .... After the service was completed, we followed U.S. Rte. 12 across Idaho. The sign that said curves next 99 miles said it all. The ride into Missoula was great.[/QUOTE]

    We looked hard riding Rte.12 Est to Missoula when we rode to Lewiston on May 24 weekend in 2017. Unfortunately there was a black ice advisory out for the Lolo Pass area so it's still on our bucket list. May 24 was a bit early that Season as most of the higher elevations still had snow on the shoulders, meltwater on the roads, and the scenic overlooks were still snow covered. As a Flatlander I can still get caught out by how elevation can change riding conditions.
     
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