What did you do to your bike today?

Discussion in 'Technical & Maintenance' started by fortech, Oct 10, 2014.

  1. Bob

    Bob Active Member

    A year ago we didn't hesitate to go anywhere up north (Yukon, NWT, Alaska) with an extra 5L can of gas. Never passed a gas pump without topping up so didn't need our 'reserve' gas but had it just in case. Some riders carried more than 5L depending on where they were headed, the weather forecast and in case a road was closed and they had to turn back before the next gas.

    There's a lot of little mom and pop pumps and card locks on the longer stretches so we won't know for a while if or how Covid affected these. If anyone is headed up that way next season I'd suggest ordering a copy of the 2021 Milepost to familiarize yourself with that and also post any questions on the Alaska regional forum on advrider.com as they'll have current info before the next riding season starts.

    I think the Trans Tiaga would be a great ride but more of a logistical challenge WRT gas and I don't know where or how to get info on that. Also I'm assuming that's a mostly camping trip so there's extra weight and wind resistance on your gas mileage. Maybe someone on here has ridden the Trans Tiaga or plans to and can chime in?
     
  2. skibum69

    skibum69 Well-Known Member

    Oh yeah, 5 gallons of gas will add a lot but when you're really far from services it might just be what you need.

    I know a few folks who have ridden the TT, I got an invite to join Throttlemeister when he left the Skibum Soiree in 2009 but I couldn't get my shit together fast enough to go.

    There are a bunch of resources about it online, I've read quite a few of them. For me I'm happy camping all the way.

    I like the thought that when you get to the end of it you're as far from any community by road that you can get in North America!
     
  3. RossKean

    RossKean Active Member

    Seal-Mated the left side fork seal for the second time this year. Very slow oil leak. It is difficult to do a really good job on cleaning dirt out of the seals with the forks on the bike. Sometime in the next week or so, I am going to change fork oil and give the seals a really good cleaning at the same time with the forks off the bike. Might be time to change seals (and bushings) but I think I will try to get another year out of them. Quite a few miles since the Traxxion AK20 setup was done...
     
  4. skibum69

    skibum69 Well-Known Member

    I put the back wheel on the 525 so I can roll it out of the way to run 14' boards on the table saw.:p
     
  5. Bob

    Bob Active Member

    Ahhh... so you went with the Traxxion suspension. Was told that transforms the bike, especially the heavier tourers.
     
  6. Bob

    Bob Active Member

    Seal Mates work? I bought one in a KTM dealer for $9.99 where I went looking for 'shock sox' or similar. Figured I paid three times what it was worth, like just about everything else there. Keep it on the bike anyway as a reminder to grab some exposed negatives next time I'm home.
     
  7. RossKean

    RossKean Active Member

    Makes a big difference for sure. In addition to the AK20 up front, there is a Penske rear shock.

    Yes. Probably 75% of the time, a leaky fork seal does NOT need to be replaced. The Seal Mate (or a free home-made version) effectively removes dirt from between the fork tube and the seal lip. Obviously won't help if the seal is very worn, has been damaged or you have a scratched fork tube. I always keep it on the bike. $9.99 is probably $9.49 more than it costs to make and package them but at the price it is cheap insurance. (I have a store-bought one but I have made them from a plastic milk jug)
     
    Bob likes this.
  8. skibum69

    skibum69 Well-Known Member

    Soooo...yesterday I brought the 1100S in to the Toy Box to get a new front tire that's been waiting a couple of months. Because they are in the middle of moving things are super busy so I pulled off the wheel myself so all Keith had to do was swap the tire. We were chatting and I was asking about slippery mould residue etc and he said it was pretty much a myth and it would be fine. All good, got it back together to get out of there. I was turning left out of the shop and gassed it a little crossing the first 2 lanes and the next thing I know I'm sliding along the ground watching the bike sliding in front of me. Well then! Thankfully I had the bags on so it was barely laying down and easy to pick up. A kid who stopped in his car jumped out to give me a hand and another guy got out of his truck to see if I was ok. I didn't feel a thing honestly and the damage to the bike was minimal, just a little scuff on the cylinder head and the side bag and a couple of minor scuffs on my Klim suit. It barely even bruised my ego. I hopped back on and rode away. Of all the stories I've heard of people wiping out on new tires it's my first. My buddy racing wrecked himself pretty good a couple of years ago from the same. As you might imagine I rode very gently for the rest of the day and it was in the back of my head riding home in the rain. Good times!
     
    Backdraft likes this.
  9. TonisToo

    TonisToo Active Member

    Wow that sucks, glad you were not hurt. Every time I get a new tire installed there I get a warning about this. Definitely not the first time this has happened to someone and not a myth in my opinion.
     
  10. skibum69

    skibum69 Well-Known Member

    Obviously not a myth. I ran into Chris Bell a little while later and he was telling about a guy who bought a brand new 2000R and dumped it right out of the shop turning right. I covered the scuff on the cylinder head with a Sharpie, you can't even tell now. Now I need 2 new side cases.
     
  11. RossKean

    RossKean Active Member

  12. skibum69

    skibum69 Well-Known Member

    Some good info there, on my offroad tires I usually try to go ride around in gravel for a bit to get the rubber roughed up. My new tire is looking good now with over 200 km's on it so far.
     
  13. murph

    murph Well-Known Member

    My preferred but not always feasable method is to bring my wheels to the shop to have them mounted and when I return home scuff them with sandpaper/emery cloth. I have done the "dump it in front of the dealer" thing on new rubber making a left out of the lot. If I am getting a set mounted at the shop I bring a strip of emery cloth with me.
     
  14. skibum69

    skibum69 Well-Known Member

    Reading that little blurb they say it doesn't really do much.
     
  15. murph

    murph Well-Known Member

    Probably not but it works for my peace of mind and I have not dumped it on new tires in over 10 years.
    Maybe only the same as a few hundred meters but sometimes that is all you need.
     
    Last edited: Sep 23, 2020 at 3:40 PM
  16. Backdraft

    Backdraft Active Member

    Quick run on a dirt road is what I do
     
    HunterSon likes this.
  17. skibum69

    skibum69 Well-Known Member

    Whatever works, fresh out of the box obviously does not work.
     
  18. Bob

    Bob Active Member

    Easily done. Cold tires on cold wet pavement always give me the heebe-geebies regardless of their pedigree or caducity.
    Glad you didn't hurt yourself.
     
  19. Trash

    Trash Well-Known Member

    Glad to hear that you and that R100S are both all right, Mike.
    Whenever I get new tires, I find a nearby parking lot and ride ever tightening circles in both directions until I have scuffed in the tires on both sides. It only takes about 15 minutes, but it seems to scuff all of the release agents off the tires. :)
     
  20. skibum69

    skibum69 Well-Known Member

    It's not release agent, if you read that article it talks about the hard slippery new tire surface. Your method makes sense, I should remember that. I did go ride around in a dirt parking lot a little while later.
     

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