Tube Tires

Discussion in 'Technical & Maintenance' started by HerrDeacon, Nov 29, 2017.

  1. HerrDeacon

    HerrDeacon Active Member

    Any of you guys have bikes with tubeless tires? How do you find them? Ever need to repair a flat on the road? What tools do you carry to break the bead?

    I've been casually looking around at bikes that may replace my CB if I decide to sell, but the majority of bikes that tick most of my boxes have tube tires and I'm not really sure if I want to deal with them. Its one thing to change them out in the comfort of your own garage but wondering what kind of hassle they are when repairing them on the road, especially the rear. All my other bikes have tubes but they are only around town bikes so no big deal, but with this bike I'll be traveling around and usually by myself.
     
  2. Wayne

    Wayne Well-Known Member

    Tubeless tires are much easier to repair as you know, most of the time a simple plug can get you home. However 'most' tubeless are on cast rims, with the exception of the GSA and Tenere I believe (and maybe others) which have the best of both worlds. Downside to cast aluminum is that they tend to crack under hard enough impact and there is no trail fix for a cracked leaking rim that I know of.

    Tube type are mostly on spoke rims, which are much stronger and will usually bend and not crack. But fixing a flat is a little more labor intensive.

    As for breaking the bead on the trail, you could try the side stand technique. Depending on the hole, sometimes you just need to break down one side just enough to haul out the tube. I've practiced patching tubes at home and surprisingly the patch works very well. I've also patched a tire three times on the same trip one day....long day. TIP: sometimes a single nail puncture can put a hole on BOTH sides of the tube, requiring two patches!

    I also made a trail side bead breaker. You are more than welcome to have it to try and or copy to make your own. I'll dig up a pic later. Tire levers, I made using spanner wrenches, cutting off the open end and grinding to a smooth end. The box end of the same wrench is used for the axle nuts.
     
  3. Trash

    Trash Active Member

    Tube style tires are enough of a reason for me to look for a different bike. With that said, I will also be the first to admit that I am not a trail rider, and in my experience, tubeless tires and cast wheels have performed flawlessly on the unimproved roads like the TLH and Dalton and Denali “Highways” that I like to travel. It is a different story altogether if you plan to venture onto paths and trails. I know that spoked wheels look sexy, but I have never had a cast wheel go out of balance, or get damaged by an impact, and I have found some impressive potholes in my time. Plus, all I need to carry with me on a trip is a tire patch kit and tire pump to handle a potential flat.
     
  4. TonisToo

    TonisToo Active Member

    Love my tubeless tires on spoked wheels on the 2011 GS. New GS850 also gone this route now. Poked a hole in my rear Tourance on the gravel outside Colinet and I was able to plug it and be back on the road in about 15 minutes and that was my first time ever doing it. Also really liked the warning the tire pressure monitor gave me so I could pull over quickly and maintain control. Like Trash, it would be a big consideration in purchasing a bike for me.
     
  5. HerrDeacon

    HerrDeacon Active Member

    Yes, and me too, totally agree. I don't do any extreme off-roading but I do go off the beaten path sometimes or out of cell range so not sure I want the hassle. Plus its just more stuff you need to carry around with you. Also, I know there are options out there to convert spokes to tubeless but I don't think I'd have any trust in them. I really like the spoked rims on the GS and newer V-Stroms, best of both worlds. Will just have to keep looking at different options or change my requirements :)
     
  6. Wayne

    Wayne Well-Known Member

    Yes those tubeless spoke rims have the best of both worlds, I really like the design as well. And a major +1 on the TPMS!
     
  7. Wayne

    Wayne Well-Known Member


    There is always Tubliss if you really want a tubeless spoked rim.
     
  8. HerrDeacon

    HerrDeacon Active Member

    I wouldn't have any faith in an add on system like that, or at least it would always be on my mind when riding, distracting.
     
  9. Wayne

    Wayne Well-Known Member

    I guess personal preference. It has warned me of low tire pressures a few times. Mostly because I have my low warning set to 24psi.....and believe it or not but the psi changes a nice bit with temperature. So even with 30psi in my tires, on a cold morning it might read 24psi. As long as the number increases as you ride then you are good to go. If it remains the same or decreases than a good idea to check for a leak. My last ride I got a cold temp warning for my front tire, below 5 degrees. Completely wireless, long battery life, automatically on/off and only minutes to install.

    On a long ride, especially at highway speeds it's reassuring to know the PSI is the same or increasing. It could help prevent a blow out at highway speeds.

    As for the distraction, no different that looking at your speedo. I'm not texting with it, lol.
     
  10. HerrDeacon

    HerrDeacon Active Member

    No, sorry, I wasn't referring to the TPMS but the Tubliss add-on in the tire. It would always be on my mind when riding.
     
  11. Wayne

    Wayne Well-Known Member

    True, and I don't know anybody using tubliss. I've heard it's a bit of a paint to install, and you would need to drill a second hole in your rim for the bead lock. In the meantime, tube type or tubeless would be a deal breaker for me.
     
  12. RossKean

    RossKean Active Member

    That seems like a really big excursion between cold and warm! This can happen if the interior of the tire is wet. While air (or nitrogen) behaves more-or-less like an "ideal gas" with respect to temperature change, water vapour does not due to condensation - you can see a big pressure drop as a function of temperature. For an "ideal gas", pressure should change around 7% going from 20 °C to 0 °C; 2 to 3 psi. Try to use a decent dry air source when you fill the tire and don't use gobs of tire snot (which contains water) when mounting tubeless tires. This is the primary advantage of using nitrogen (I don't) - it is typically really dry. Air from compressors can be saturated.

    I don't have TPMS but the next bike might.
     
    TonisToo likes this.
  13. TonisToo

    TonisToo Active Member

    I've only found the difference between cold and hot tires to register 0.1 Bars in the difference. Which is only 1.5 psi. Wish there was a way to change the units of pressure though.
     
  14. Wayne

    Wayne Well-Known Member

    For most every ride, as my tires heat up, the PSI increases.....and usually 4psi consistently . On the highway on a hot day it could rise 6psi. Is it 100% accurate, well probably not......but it is a good indicator! I use a drier on my compressor and only a smear of tire slick when mounting. Our plane tires use Nitrogen, I might try that next season just to compare.
     
  15. RossKean

    RossKean Active Member

    For DRY air (or N2), the pressure is directly proportional to the absolute temperature (° Kelvin). Pressurized gas does not behave strictly as "ideal" but any residual moisture will have a much bigger effect than air vs nitrogen.

    On a day that starts out cool (10 °), it is conceivable that the actual tire temperature could end out at 40 ° or even higher. 5 psi or more is certainly possible under extreme conditions - even with dry fill gas.
     
  16. Trash

    Trash Active Member

    Maybe there is. My GS shows tire pressure as psi.
    I don’t know if it is a function of being purchased in the USA .
    My external temperature display is in degrees F., is yours in degrees C.?
    If so on all three counts, I am glad I bought the bike I did! :p
     
  17. Trash

    Trash Active Member

    The Independent shop that mounts and balances my new tires for me uses Nitrogen exclusively to fill the tires.
    He is a former Harley Davidson Factory Master Mechanic, and swears by the stuff.
    I am much to smart to suggest to him that I don’t notice a difference in performance, even though I don’t.
     
  18. HerrDeacon

    HerrDeacon Active Member

    That settles it, just added it to my cart ;) First time I've seen a motorcycle site where you could buy the bike online using PayPal, making it way too easy. Anyone have a coupon, LOL.

    F850GS.jpg
     
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  19. TonisToo

    TonisToo Active Member

    Try "BlackFriday"! Ha!
     
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  20. TonisToo

    TonisToo Active Member

    Yeah it's all metric!
     

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