Planning... have you started.

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Jim C-G, Nov 2, 2018.

  1. Trash

    Trash Active Member

    Ah!
    Another Map Person!
    There aren’t many of us left. :oops:
     
    Stevenl likes this.
  2. Jim C-G

    Jim C-G Active Member

    The past couple of years I have mostly been traveling in areas I have already traveled in the past 40+ years. With this last trip down to North Carolina, I was in new territory once I left New Hampshire/Vermont. Even though I had certainly Google Mapped most of my intended route before leaving and then again when I had wifi. I had even printed out my planned days and then got 1/2 day ahead which fouled up all my planned stops. It's great to put destinations and waypoints into the GPS but you really don't see the big picture. I like maps for that. All I had was the small GPS screen, the road and a few signs to give me an idea of where I was. I remember pulling off at a rest stop in Virginia and looking at the large map on the wall. It did not have a "You Are Here" sticker... I literally had no idea where I was on that map as I had been following the GPS so long. Broke down and turned on the phone GPS to get orientated. I missed my maps!
    The other thing is being able to mark on the map each night (or lunch break) what road you have traveled. for me that is important for when I edit video later.
     
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  3. Bob

    Bob Active Member

    + 1 for road maps.
    If you're bored, just open a road map in public;)
    Plus it's harder to plan a trip by throwing darts at a GPS... so there is that:cool:
     
    Trash likes this.
  4. Jim C-G

    Jim C-G Active Member

    If you know where you are going... a GPS will get you there.
    If you want the most convoluted scenic way of getting there... that's when you need a map or two.
     
    Trash likes this.
  5. HunterSon

    HunterSon Active Member

    I make maps. Not ones where you could ride a bike though.
     
  6. Bob

    Bob Active Member

    Totally! Plus there's always Susan Bennett...:D
     
  7. Jim C-G

    Jim C-G Active Member

    That's neat... always like to see what is behind the scene. How much has changed in the last 65 years. Looking forward to the next... well, 40? lol
    On that note, the original Blade Runner was set in November 2019 - there are a lot of technological advances due in the next 12 month.
     
  8. dresda

    dresda Member

    I love maps. I have several venerable Mapart Road Atlases that I treasure - Ontario, Atlantic Canada and Quebec. I have a drawer full of Mapart maps. Too bad they are out of print now, I really preferred them to the Rand McNally maps we get now.

    I have a map of the Gaspe pinned to the dining room wall right now, planning for next summer. I'm a major map geek, no matter what format.

    I have the Mapart map of Newfoundland from my trip in 2008, with all the lighthouses I visited written on it. Laminated :)
     
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  9. Trash

    Trash Active Member

    You have the best of both worlds: you are a map geek, and EmBeeDee is the GPS genius.
    You can’t get lost!
     
    dresda likes this.
  10. Jim C-G

    Jim C-G Active Member

    I just looked at my United States map that hangs in the hall with my 2008 cross continent route on it. 22,000 km. in 28 riding days. It'a a Mapart map... they do make nice maps. The 2019 Rand MacNally came yesterday. It will work to keep track of 2019 trips. I have now mapped out over 20,000 km over an 8 week period... dates of rallies are squeezing it... maybe I need to put some things off til '20 lol. I don't know if I'll be able to do all this, but it is fun dreaming.
     
  11. dresda

    dresda Member

    Well, because EmmBeeDee doesn't ever look at a map he doesn't have the bigger picture in his head. So I do the navigating. He knows all the bells and whistles and setups for the devices. I know where the places are and all the ways to get there.

    eta: And I frequently use the straight line - direct routing - to navigate, choosing my own roads. My first GPS was an eMap and that's the only way it could navigate. Its very handy here in Eastern Ontario where there are so many routes to choose from.

    I find it hilarious how differently our GPSs are set up. We both have identical Montanas. I had to set up a profile for me to use on his GPS because I like north up (from looking at maps all the time), no auto-zoom, and I have 4 data fields. His is auto-zoom, track up and Nuvi mode. I only use track up if I'm leading a group along a track.
     
  12. Trash

    Trash Active Member

    Being an Old Map Guy, I don’t know how I got myself talked into purchasing a Navigator for my BMW.
    Now that I have owned it for years, I can honestly say that the only feature it has that I really appreciate is the ability to determine where the gas stations are when the low fuel light energizes. It makes it easier to maximize mileage per tank.
     
    Last edited: Nov 29, 2018
  13. Jim C-G

    Jim C-G Active Member

    I will admit that I really have appreciated my TomTom in city situations. I like the maps for giving me a sense of where I am going whereas the GPS seems to just tell me where to go.
     
  14. TonisToo

    TonisToo Active Member

    I have a large laminated map in my garage for trip planning. Trash stuck a whack of red flags on it and I am trying to tick them off by connecting the dots in a series of trips. Once I get the basic idea I will start with Google to narrow down possible routes, sights to see, and campgrounds. I really need to spend more time this winter learning some mapping-GPS software.
     

    Attached Files:

  15. Trash

    Trash Active Member

    You moved it!
     
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  16. Bob

    Bob Active Member

    "The flogging will continue until planning improves":
    Ordered the 2019 Milepost at Chapters in Kelowna this week, delivery in mid Feb. They had a 2018 in stock for the same price as a 2019 (~$45.00CDN) but wouldn't discount it so I'll wait for the 2019.
    Maps will just be the roadmaps from last time or Visitors Centres, gas stations etc. I'll run the Garmin Montana 650 as usual and save/upload the daily routes for posterity or whatever to reflect on in my dotage. I will soft mount the GPS to my tank bag as the bar mount is a bit rough on gravel roads.
    Need a new headlight guard as the previous one vibrated off on a FSR.
    Cleaned everything off behind the rider's seat to replace the bike's alarm battery so will leave that off and use soft luggage.
    Tool tubes are under construction... thinking tire levers between motor and bash plate; tools in a 3.5" tube above the muffler; non-tool stuff in a tube on the right side.
    I'd like to mount a cheap 2 gallon gas can on the right rear passenger peg. Going to need to fab up a generic mount for that to take different sizes/shapes of gas cans.
    May add a couple of guards to protect some low hanging fruit, but other than that, 40K service May 17, reinstall the K60s and we're good to go.:)
     
    Last edited: Dec 22, 2018
  17. dresda

    dresda Member

    Yes, there is no substitute for a real map. I always carry maps - usually a road atlas (so much easier to manage on the side of the road on a windy day), folding maps (for spreading out on the bed in the evening to see where we are and where we want to go) and of course the GPS (which helps me find where I am on the map plus distances etc).
     
  18. Backdraft

    Backdraft Active Member

    Either Burgeo to Bay l'Argent along south coast with Ferries and do the Boot then home... or Trans Lab again.....
     
  19. skibum69

    skibum69 Active Member

    I like maps too but my iphone certainly was handy navigating us from NYC to DC and back via the Delaware coast. On my moto I use my GPS for time and speed mostly.
     
  20. cberry

    cberry Member

    Next season is still a dream, nothing specific. Today's club breakfast ride - seasonable: 20-27 degrees C :)

    It's easier (less illegal) here in the states with most interstate's speed limit of 70 mph and our successful riders complete the ride in about 18 hours, about 55 mph, average. To complete in less than 24 hours the average speed has to be just 42 mph. All those mentioned factors have to be included in the total time.... no excuses. Our riders typically move with the faster traffic, up to speed limit + 9 mph, or 79 mph as measured by GPS.
     

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