Labrador paving etc. - Split from Coronavirus thread...

Discussion in 'Newfoundland & Labrador Travel Information' started by RossKean, Apr 24, 2020.

  1. TonisToo

    TonisToo Active Member

    Our Government will always promise a Mercedes, tender a Honda Accord and deliver a used Hyundai Pony... behind schedule and over budget with a political scandal requiring an enquiry.
     
    Bob likes this.
  2. skibum69

    skibum69 Well-Known Member

    Ain't that the truth!
     
  3. Bob

    Bob Active Member

    Anyone remember when towns used salt water to keep the dust down, especially on 'wash days' when clothesline's were hung with laundry?
    Worked the charm, set up nice and hard, and wasn't slippy when it rained like calcium chloride.

    Also, maintaining long stretches of political pavement over time is still a relatively new concept in Labrador. Tar and gravel method seems to work well in Yukon, NWT and Alaska. Not perfect by any means, harder on tires, and rain troughs are the opposite of southern paved roads. Bit, this method allows for the installation of a "live patch" when frost heaves run hundreds of meters long and several meters deep.

    This construction method requires that traffic "run in" the road surface after the crews have moved along. This "running in" provides an opportunity for the entrepid motorcyclists to familiarize themselves with riding on marbles in dust and heavy traffic at highway speed for hours on end. Your cornering technique(s) can not help but improve. Just sayin':D
     
  4. skibum69

    skibum69 Well-Known Member

    Then there was spraying oil on roads to keep the dust down too
     
  5. murph

    murph Well-Known Member

    I remember oil but not salt water. Cheap on the coast but the Eagle River would be a haul.
     
  6. TonisToo

    TonisToo Active Member

    The state of Maine appears to be still doing this :eek:
     
  7. fortech

    fortech Active Member

    I witnessed them doing something similar in Northern BC last summer. Any cracks in the road we’re slathered with a heavy layer of tar. The crew would then spread a layer of gravel over the tar and leave. A few days later a sweeping crew would follow up the rear and brush off whatever gravel was left and not “ran in”.
     
  8. HerrDeacon

    HerrDeacon Active Member

    When I was out to the Tides Cove Point lighthouse last summer the first section of the dirt road was oiled down. It was only around where all the houses/cabins were, guessing just to keep the dust down for the residents. Smell reminded me of my old oiled baseball glove I had as a kid :)
     
  9. TonisToo

    TonisToo Active Member

    Sounds like what I would call "chip-seal". Great roads for cracked windsheilds and broken headlights.
     
  10. Bob

    Bob Active Member

    True., I remember roads sprayed with 'oil' that smelled like a furnace oil and base pan lube combo. Like you say, no problem getting a drop of salt water out around The Bay...;)
     
  11. Bob

    Bob Active Member

    I know... they do that here in the Okanagan too. Seems to work well, better than just plain tar, but can make sharp corners sketchy for a while.
     
  12. skibum69

    skibum69 Well-Known Member

    I remember chip seal, knarly stuff
     
  13. Bob

    Bob Active Member

    Couldn't find a clip of them repairing big frost heaves but here's blurb on low tire pressures during earlier Alaska road construction;
    And here's an example of the recent 'wicking fabric' I've seen used:
     
  14. skibum69

    skibum69 Well-Known Member

    Can't open it
     

Share This Page