I got nailed

Discussion in 'Technical & Maintenance' started by Wayne, Jul 9, 2020.

  1. Backdraft

    Backdraft Active Member

    This is the one I bought

    Screenshot_20200731-075619_Amazon Shopping.jpg
     
  2. skibum69

    skibum69 Well-Known Member

    I just bought that exact one Bob from Motopumps, nice looking piece of kit. What I didn't know when I ordered it was that the 1100 comes with it's own complete tire repair kit. The interesting thing to me is that now I have 2 sizes of plugs to play with. All of it lives under the seat.

    [​IMG]
     
  3. HunterSon

    HunterSon Active Member

    I have a Motopump and Dynaplug kit too. The Air Shot pump hits above its weight class.
     
  4. Backdraft

    Backdraft Active Member

    Gearing up for Wed ride from Burgeo to the boot ... I have like 4 tire inflation type kits aboard... Didn't realize it.. lol... 2 pumps and 2 kits of pressurized gas..... Good to go
     
  5. skibum69

    skibum69 Well-Known Member

    You might make it!

    And yes the little Air Shot is a great pump, I just used it to pump up the 640 tires. Rob the owner is a really nice guy who gives great customer support. When I ordered my new one he still had me on record from when I ordered my first one in '07.
     
  6. Wayne

    Wayne Well-Known Member

    Has anybody used co2 to air up a tire to plug?

    I find it’s easier to plug a tire when it’s fully inflated. I’ve used co2 to inflate a tubed tire and I wasn’t impressed, so I’m not sure how well the co2 will work to fully inflate a tubeless tire. And while on the topic, bicycle pumps are pretty much useless for motorcycle tires imho.
     
  7. Wayne

    Wayne Well-Known Member

    Seems like a “better mouse trap.” Have you tested this kit? For me, I think I’m sticking to the tried and true method of the rope style plugs.
     
  8. Backdraft

    Backdraft Active Member

    Have not used it... Yet.. hopefully I won't have to..

    This one of the pumps. (The other I have is your typical portable pump)
    The Air hawk has a rechargeable battery. No problem topping up tires with it 14904d.jpg
     
  9. RossKean

    RossKean Active Member

    Reviews seem to be mixed but generally positive on the Stop&Go kits. (I have only seen the ones with the "gun" insertion tool.) No idea if the bad reviews were due to the plug limitations, improper usage or a hole that was too big or irregularly shaped. Personally, I use the sticky strings and have not had a failure - running tires to the end of their natural life. Probably five times in the last fifteen years or so.
    The "right" way to do it is with a patch-plug from the inside but this isn't an option from the side of the road and since most MC shops won't repair flats, you are out of luck unless you change your own tires. A sticky string may leak (not good) or pop out completely (very bad). While a patch-plug might leak, it can't pop out with the resulting catastrophic deflation. I use a "Slime" pump.
    https://www.amazon.ca/anti-crevaison-caoutchouc-réparation-agricoles-Champignon/dp/B07D5HG767/ref=sr_1_6?dchild=1&keywords=patch+plug&qid=1596373752&sr=8-6
     
  10. Wayne

    Wayne Well-Known Member


    I think the rope style is better than the patch plug style. And like you said the patch plug style is much more difficult as a side road repair. I highly doubt a rope style would ever pop out and worst case they’d give a slow leak, in which the TPMS comes in handy! For me, my tires are a yearly thing, so whatever works to get through the season is good for me.

    I also look at weight on the bike, and always looking for gear that’s smaller, lighter and easier to pack.
     
  11. Bob

    Bob Active Member

    Some nice looking kits above.
    For tubeless roadside repairs I carry half a dozen fresh sticky rope plugs, T-handle plugging tools, and cheap stripped down electric pump.
     
  12. Bob

    Bob Active Member

    The kids use this Giant Control Tank, works well, lots of applications:
    AB4EB0E9-2F49-4661-BF5D-AF05CCF5FCF5.jpeg
    Brief demo::
     
  13. skibum69

    skibum69 Well-Known Member

    I have a couple of foot pumps for bicycles but they work fine for motos too. When I’m travelling I carry a good Mtn bike hand pump for backup.
     
  14. HerrDeacon

    HerrDeacon Active Member

    All the talk so far has been around tubeless tires, what about tubed types? What are you tubed guys taking with you on the road? Spare tubes? Both front and rear or just front? Just a patch kit? What type of kit just a simple bicycle one?
     
  15. Wayne

    Wayne Well-Known Member

    On multiple day trips with luggage I have packed spare front and rear tubes. But for day trips I only packed the patch kit. The patches work well, but best to practice using patches at home first.

    Also keep in mind that sometimes you don’t need to remove the wheel from the bike or remove the tire from the rim. Sometimes you can just break the bead in the area of the leak, pull out just enough tube, patch and reinstall. And if you think you have a good bicycle pump, try inflating a tire at home first. I tried with a bicycle pump and it did nothing. My combo is air compressor and co2 cartridges.
     
  16. skibum69

    skibum69 Well-Known Member

    3 of my bikes are tubed tires, I have 1 spare tube under the seat of the R65. Travelling on the 640 I carry both front and rear spares and a patch kit, plus I have my 17 volt Air Shot pump. For me no way can I see trying to fix a tube flat without taking the wheel off. I should get some more tire levers to keep on the R65 permanently.

    My patch kits are regular. I cycle ones. In this article by Lyndon Poskitt he talks about tubes etc. Good read.
    https://advrider.com/tubes-tubeless-or-mousses-for-adventure-riding/

    Been there...
    [​IMG]
     
  17. Backdraft

    Backdraft Active Member

    Great read. Thanks
     
  18. HerrDeacon

    HerrDeacon Active Member

    I'll check out the link
     

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