Bound to Happen Eventually

Discussion in 'Out & About' started by Trash, Mar 17, 2019.

?

When was my last m/c flat tire?

Poll closed Apr 14, 2019.
  1. Within the Last Year

    1 vote(s)
    12.5%
  2. Two - Three Years Ago

    2 vote(s)
    25.0%
  3. Long Ago

    4 vote(s)
    50.0%
  4. Never

    1 vote(s)
    12.5%
  1. Trash

    Trash Active Member

    So, I took off for a little ride this morning, and got about two miles before the TPMS Warning illuminated, showing rear pressure down to 29psi. A quick ride back to the apartment allowed me to air it up with a bicycle pump, and I was back to the Triumph Dealership which luckily is open every day. The bad news is they, like most Dealers these days, refuse to repair punctures like the one this ten penny nail inflicted. They didn't have a replacement Pirelli Angel ST in stock, but did agree to match the lowest online price I could find of $130. I guess I can't complain too much as it has been 20+ years and 200,000+ miles since my last flat tire. I will ask for my old tire back to see if it is worth repairing, given it is probably nearly half worn anyway with 4,200 miles on it. :rolleyes:
     
    TonisToo likes this.
  2. RossKean

    RossKean Active Member

    I started carrying a "Slime" pump and a sticky string kit when I am on a trip somewhere. May not bother closer to home. Haven't used it yet.
     
  3. murph

    murph Well-Known Member

    My plug kit was of no use last year on the 138 in Quebec when a tire defect caused a separation in the tread block. Hitched a ride 30kms to
    Forestville with the rear wheel and got it booted. Replaced the tire the next day because I was not comfortable with the tire, the makeshift repair or the distance to home. I have kept a plugged spare and used it without issue but insurance companies do not approve.
     
  4. Bob

    Bob Active Member

    My last flat was on a rear tire in 2006 in Terra Nova Park. It took three string plugs to get me back to Clarenville. I know I probably shouldn't, but I've kept riding on a newish tire that only takes one plug to fix... like a small clean puncture from a nail or screw that caused a slow leak in the tire. If it takes two or more plugs I don't keep it.
     
  5. Wayne

    Wayne Well-Known Member

    I've only been riding since 2007, and knock on wood I haven't had a flat. On longer rides, I always carry tire plugs/tools, air compressor and some co2 cartridges. I think TPMS is a great feature especially on a motorcycle....I've heard of a few stories where people safely stopped before the tire went completely flat. If your bike doesn't come with a TPMS, the SPY version works perfect and is completely wireless.
     
  6. RossKean

    RossKean Active Member

    I don't currently have TPMS although I am tempted to get it. Trouble can be lack of visibility of warnings with a rapid deflation scenario. (Wouldn't be something that is in the normal line-of-sight.) If nothing else, it helps keep track of any sort of slow leak.
     
  7. Wayne

    Wayne Well-Known Member

    My SPY TPMS does flash a red warning. In a rapid deflation scenario, likely no warning will help before the tire is flat. They way I use mine is I look at the reading at the start of my ride....then check to make sure that number rises (usually 5 psi or more). If I notice this number remaining the same, or dropping, then I know I have a slow leak. Ross, maybe a good idea for your trailer tires too?
     
  8. RossKean

    RossKean Active Member

    Good thought on the trailer tires. They are out of sight and a failed trailer tire could be quite messy on a bike. I guess you could get a TPMS system designed for cars with four sensors. With respect to warnings, I think it would be used to monitor as opposed to an emergency warning - at least for me.
     
    Wayne likes this.
  9. skibum69

    skibum69 Active Member

    Been awhile since I've had a flat. My partner going to Siberia is planning on testing the Tubliss system over the summer to consider for the Siberia/Mongolia trip. I have a hard time thinking anything more complicated than tubes is a good way to go.
     
  10. Trash

    Trash Active Member

    I never have been crazy about having to dismount a tire just to repair a simple puncture, as is necessary with tube type tires. I can see the wisdom of carrying spare inner tubes for tubeless tires if one plans to travel to extremely remote areas, however. I believe that it is no coincidence that I stopped getting flat tires about the same time that I switched to tubeless. ;)
     
  11. skibum69

    skibum69 Active Member

    Sure, whatever you say but tubeless is not an option for my 525
     
  12. Trash

    Trash Active Member

    I understand fully!
    And, like you, I am not a Tubliss fan either.
    The K.I.S.S. philosophy works for me, the further one gets from home!
     
  13. Jim C-G

    Jim C-G Active Member

    It's been a while since I had a flat. I like the fact that tubeless tires don't deflate in the same way as a tubed tire. I had a tubed rear tire blow at 70 mph when I was much, much younger. I managed to get it slowed down and to the side of the road without dumping the bike but it felt like I was sitting on a garbage bag full of caplin. Not that I have ever done that, but I am sure that's what it would feel like.
     
  14. skibum69

    skibum69 Active Member

    I lost all the air from my front tire almost instantly doing 90 in Labrador. That was a pucker moment!
     
  15. Jim C-G

    Jim C-G Active Member

    Indeed that would be!
     
  16. skibum69

    skibum69 Active Member

    Full on tank slippers until I finally stopped still upright. I could not believe I wasn’t in the ditch!
     
  17. murph

    murph Well-Known Member

    My rapid deflation in Quebec occurred as I was passing a double trailered semi. I almost backed out of the throttle but the pickup behind me was passing as well and was coming up fast. Continued the pass and swung in front of the semi and right over to the roadside. Scared the shit out of me with the back end wobbling.
     
  18. Trash

    Trash Active Member

    Based on everything I have read and personal experience, you ended up pretty much doing what you should have, by keeping steady throttle, then slowly reducing speed.

    Sort of the same experience as encountering deep sand or loose gravel.
    Kind of counter-intuitive, but it keeps from upsetting the chassis.
    And like every life experience that doesn’t kill you, it adds to your skill. :eek:
     

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