2012 Yamaha Tenere

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by RossKean, Jul 21, 2020.

  1. RossKean

    RossKean Active Member

    Does anyone know anything about this model year? Major changes since 2012? (Don't really care much about electronic suspension, traction control or fancy dash electronics.)

    I have been considering some sort of "Adventure" bike for the roads less traveled. I have been looking at something like a 650 Vstrom - you can get a decent price for a new one reasonably equipped with hard aluminum bags, crash bars, skid plate etc. For a little less money, I came across a 2012 Tenere with about 40,000 km (25,000 miles) on it. No question that it is a lot more bike than the WeeStrom but I know nothing about the various Tenere model years. What essential changes have they made since 2012? I know electronic suspension was added and I expect changes were made to dash and electronics.

    So, what is the downside to the 2012?

    Comes with bark busters, engine guards, metal skid plate, Yamaha hard bags and topbox, Vstream shield, grip warmers, centerstand, throttle lock, headlight protectors etc. Not a mark on it!



    [​IMG]
     
  2. Wayne

    Wayne Well-Known Member

    See Fortech, he just sold a 2012
     
  3. RossKean

    RossKean Active Member

    Thanks Wayne, I will send him a PM.
     
  4. skibum69

    skibum69 Well-Known Member

    Looks decent
     
  5. RossKean

    RossKean Active Member

    Bike looks really good but I am told I should be looking at 2014+ for some significant improvements?
    I can't deny I would like to have the electronically adjustable suspension and cruise control offered on the newer bikes but the lack of these would not necessarily be a dealbreaker. The dealership is asking $10,000 which puts it at the high end for Teneres of that vintage - even ones that are at least as well equipped. It would be much more compelling if it was another $1000 or $1200 less.
     
  6. Wayne

    Wayne Well-Known Member

    I must admit that the throttle by wire cruise control is probably my most favorite thing on my bike. I use it on every ride and especially on the highway.
     
    Backdraft likes this.
  7. Trash

    Trash Well-Known Member

    If you are really interested in riding dirt and gravel roads, you would probably be happier with a lighter weight motorcycle.
    I guess it all depends on what percentage of pavement vs. gravel you plan to see...
     
  8. Trash

    Trash Well-Known Member

    These days, Cruise Control is no longer optional for me.
    Between the Arthritis and the Carpal Tunnel Syndrome, I probably wouldn't last three hours in the saddle without it and the highway pegs...
    And the aftermarket saddles, taller windscreens, handlebar risers, etc. etc. :D
     
    Wayne likes this.
  9. Wayne

    Wayne Well-Known Member

    Cruise control makes for a much more comfortable ride. And for me it’s a simple tip switch.....push to the side turns it on, down sets the speed, then a up/down changes the speed in 1 kph increments.

    Sorry for the highjack. And now back to OP
     
    Backdraft likes this.
  10. Wayne

    Wayne Well-Known Member

    There is a guy on The Rock with a newer Tenere that is possibly for sale.
    8E9C5C6E-7881-4FB1-A661-3E0CC0859231.jpeg
     
  11. skibum69

    skibum69 Well-Known Member

    You should buy that just for the fancy blue rims.
     
    RossKean likes this.
  12. RossKean

    RossKean Active Member

    Realistically, it would be 90% pavement. Depends on the overall situation - where I am living and whether I decide to keep my FJR long term. The FJR is is a mile-muncher and the weapon of choice for a long distance tour and the current plan is to keep it. Worth more to me than I could get for it if I sell it. The Tenere is larger than what I was considering but I don't really know...
    It is very important to me to have a bike that can get me to my riding destination in some degree of comfort - whether it is a local forest road, the Translab or the Haul Road in Alaska. No question that lighter would be better but I don't expect to do any really challenging off-road stuff.

    So far, I can manage without the CC but there are times when it would be very nice to have. I have some arthritis in my hands and reduced mobility (left hand) after surgery a number of years ago (maybe I need something with an auto-clutch - DCT on the new Africa Twin).
     
    Last edited: Jul 22, 2020
  13. RossKean

    RossKean Active Member

    Thanks. Any info on the bike?
    If I am going for 2014+, I would probably be considering an ES version. Mileage, add-ons and (of course) price are important.
     
  14. Wayne

    Wayne Well-Known Member

    If you are on FB, you can search his name for info.
     
  15. RossKean

    RossKean Active Member

    I don't do FB but my wife has an account. I will ask her to look it up for me later - headed out for a ride for the day.
     
  16. skibum69

    skibum69 Well-Known Member

    You could always look for a KLR
     
  17. Wayne

    Wayne Well-Known Member

    That would make for a nice second bike. They stopped making them in 2018 IIRC, but should be lots for sale. Cheap and cheap to modify. I upgraded front and rear suspension on my 2009 and it made a nice noticeable difference on and off road.

    The KLR is like a futon. Futon is not a great couch or bed, both does both okay. The KLR is not great on the highway or trails, but does both okay.
     
  18. murph

    murph Well-Known Member

    He has the S10 listed for 21 thousand. He likes it alot.

    Here is my experience with your dilemma.
    I came from sport touring with no dirt experience. Bought a cheap KLR and found out dirt is a completely different skillset and confidence waned because of it. Pounded the piss out of myself and the bike before I somewhat figured some things out. After that I purchased a cheap big adventure bike because I knew that my limits were gravel roads and I was OK with that. Had I bought a big bike first I would have beaten the shit out of it and me in my ignorance.
    My take is buy a cheap used KLR/DR650 and learn. Sell it at a slight loss when you are finished then figure out if you want to step up or down.
     
    Last edited: Jul 22, 2020
  19. Bob

    Bob Active Member

    Did you get to demo this bike on a dirt road or ge to do some stop and go work, short radius turns, backing up etc. on rough uneven surfaces RossKean?
    I can't speak to the particulars of a 2012 vs later years only to say that my brother is a dedicated Yamaha fan, demo'd a 2013 but passed on it. He said it was too top heavy and too tall for him. He's a solid 220lbs, 5'8" and worked in construction all his life, so strength was not the issue but he didn't like the 'feel' of it.
     
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  20. Backdraft

    Backdraft Active Member

    I've ridden a number of S10's over the years. Friend is the NL Yamaha rep.. rode the very first one on the island.... Way back when...

    Neighbor has a 2015 ES.
    They are top heavy and steering is really light... Stabilizer would be an asset...

    I'm not knocking the S10.. they are fantastic bikes...

    Dude wanting $21g is not wanting to sell. Probably has it listed cause his spouse doesn't want him having it.. lol...
     

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